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Try one of the following:

Give up complaining focus on gratitude.

Give up cynicism become an optimist.

Give up harsh judgments think kindly thoughts.

Give up worry trust in the Lord.

Give up discouragement become more hopeful.

Give up bitterness turn to forgiveness.

Give up resentment cultivate some humility.

Give up negativism be more positive.

Give up anger be more patient.

Give up pettiness become mature.

Give up gloom learn to smile.

Give up jealousy adopt a generous attitude.

Give up gossiping control your tongue.

Give up tension find more humor.

Give up giving up be persistent in prayer!

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By Mary Ann Otto, Pastoral Minister for Missionary Discipleship, St. Mary and St. Joseph Parishes, Appleton, Wisconsin

     The spirituality of stewardship and the practices that give witness to its truths are changing the heart and face of the Church in the Philippines, which identifies as a Church of the Poor, and beyond. What are the truths driving this conversion? Christian stewardship is about our identity in Jesus Christ. It’s about our trust in God’s promises. It’s about our gratitude for all God has given. It’s about responding to our God in love.

If you are unsure, ask the more than 200 delegates to the first ICSC-SPI Asian Pacific Stewardship Conference. In a written resolution following the conference, they determined that Christian stewardship is key to the renewal of persons, communities, churches and the natural world.

The conference, sponsored by the International Catholic Stewardship Council and its Asian partner, Socio-Pastoral Institute, was held February 4 to 7, 2019 at the St. Paul Center for Renewal in Alfonso, Cavite, Philippines. Attendees included 68 priests and 12 bishops from 27 dioceses. Major funding and coordination of the conference came about through the efforts of Mila Glodava, director of stewardship and administration at St. Vincent De Paul Parish in Denver, Colorado, Jose Clemente of SPI and Michael Murphy of ICSC.      There is no doubt that the Holy Spirit is moving in the stewardship efforts of the Church of the Philippines. The solemn declaration from the first Asian Pacific Conference is urgent: Let us build a Catholic Church that is imbued with the spirituality of stewardship. Let us build a Church that makes disciples who dare to go to the margins of society to proclaim the Good News. Let us build a Church that lifts the poor from poverty and is marked by preferential love for the least and lost. Let us participate in breaking in of the Lord’s Kingdom by sharing our blessings with one another, one gift at a time!

In this beautiful declaration, and the stewardship practices that it embodies, we are reminded of the first disciples and the early Church. We remember the practices that brought the Christian Church to over two billion members today and it gives us hope. We thank the Church of the Philippines for their courage in saying “yes” and their willingness to do the hard work of making disciples who respond with the heart of Christian stewards. They are a model for us all.

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Christ Our Savior,

As our Lenten journey brings us

closer to Easter,

We see with a deeper awareness

our world’s desperate need

to experience

the healing power of your

justice and peace.

Make us sacraments of your mercy

and instruments of your compassion.

Show us how to be better stewards

of your people;

through our families,

our brothers and sisters

with whom we share your Eucharist,

our neighbors, and the stranger.

Show us how to carry the cross

so that by dying to ourselves

we may give new life to others.

And strengthen our faith, so that

we may proclaim your Easter triumph

more confidently,

every day,

in word and deed.

Amen.

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Saint Luke’s theology of stewardship is well-documented. But it is also well-known that an understanding of Saint Mark’s theology of Christian discipleship in the second Gospel is necessary in order to understand Luke’s views on stewardship. Hence, Mark’s views on discipleship as well as his stewardship of Saint Peter’s memories, make him an important stewardship saint in his own right.

According to the Acts of the Apostles, Mark’s mother, Mary, owned a house in Jerusalem in which the earliest Christian community gathered. After visiting Jerusalem, Paul and Barnabas took Mark back with them to Antioch. Mark assisted them in their evangelization efforts in Cyprus, but upon their arrival by ship in Perga, he left them and returned to Jerusalem. Later, after returning to Antioch, Paul and Barnabas had an argument over Mark. Barnabas wanted to take Mark on their next missionary journey, but Paul objected on the grounds that Mark had not persevered on the previous journey. Accordingly, Barnabas took Mark back to Cyprus, and Paul set out for Syria and Cilicia with Silas.

In the letter to Philemon, Mark is mentioned among Paul’s fellow workers. When Paul was held captive in Rome, Mark was with him, giving him “comfort” (Col.4:10). In the same verse, Mark is mentioned as the cousin of Barnabas, and the Christians at Colossae are urged to offer hospitality to Mark if he should come there. Elsewhere, Timothy is asked to bring Mark to Paul, since he is useful for the apostle’s ministry. The first letter attributed to Peter, written in all likelihood from Rome, mentions Mark as the “son” of Peter, a term either of simple affection or an indication that Peter was Mark’s father in the faith. Mark’s presence in Rome with Peter would be consistent with the tradition that Mark was the steward of Peter’s memories, taking copious notes of Peter’s reflections on Jesus’ teaching and deeds. This tradition comes from the early Christian historian Eusebius, who also wrote that Mark was Peter’s “interpreter.” Many scholars believe that Mark wrote his Gospel while in Rome, although another tradition suggests that the Gospel was written in Alexandria.

Saint Mark is the patron saint of many groups including lawyers, notaries, secretaries, painters, pharmacists and interpreters. He is also the patron saint of Venice and Egypt. His traditional symbol is that of the winged lion and his feast day is April 25.

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