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Stewardship Saint

Every capital campaign requires initial donors, those major gifts in the quiet phase that ensure a strong foundational for the campaign’s future. Large gifts can stretch people’s pocketbooks, but can we imagine entirely emptying them? That’s the story of St. Katherine Drexel.

 

The daughter of a prominent investment banker in Philadelphia in1858, Katherine experienced all the trappings of high society. Still, her family was Catholic and she received a strong, faith-based upbringing. They traveled frequently, exposing young Katherine to the needs on the American frontier. After her father’s death, Katherine inherited a large sum of money.

 

Still, Katherine’s heart was not in becoming another socialite with the East Coast elite. She began parsing out her inheritance to charity work among the Native Americans. During a pilgrimage to Rome, she begged Pope Leo XIII to appeal for missionaries to the people she’d come to love. His response changed the course of Katherine’s life: “Why don’t you become a missionary?”

 

Four years later, Katherine had founded a religious order specifically to serve the Native American and African American population in the United States. Her order opened 145 missions and over 70 schools across the United States. During Katherine’s life, the cost of opening these schools was largely financed by her personal fortune of nearly $20 million – roughly $500 million today.

 

While most of us won’t be called to give away every penny to our name, Katherine’s example of total surrender can inspire us no matter our walk of life. Rather than use her money for selfish pursuits, Katherine saw a need and sought to fill it with everything she had. Where is the need in your community? How are you seeking to meet it?

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Stewardship Saint

“When [Jesus] looked up he saw some wealthy people putting their offerings into the treasury and he noticed a poor widow putting in two small coins. He said, ‘I tell you truly, this poor widow put in more than the rest” (Luke 21:1-3).

 

Juan Diego was born a member of the native Chichimeca people in central Mexico. He was not a particularly wealthy or educated man. He experienced a deep conversion to Christianity later in life. His devotion to the Eucharist led him to walk long miles to Mass and to receive formation from the local Franciscan friars. One day’s walk stood on from the rest. On December 9th, 1531, a woman appeared to him on Tepeyac Hill. She appeared in the dress of the native people and spoke to Juan Diego in his native language, but she revealed herself to be the Blessed Virgin Mary.

 

Juan Diego was entrusted with a mission both simple and profound – to ask the local bishop to construct a shrine. Upon his first request, the bishop was understandably skeptical. He instructed Juan Diego to ask Mary for a sign. Three days later, Juan Diego returned to Tepayac Hill. There, Mary appeared again and fragrant roses bloomed out of season. Juan Diego picked the roses and returned to the bishop.

 

Here was a simple gift from a simple man – a mantle full of roses. Yet as the roses tumbled from Juan Diego’s cloak, there on the fabric was the image now so familiar across the world – Our Lady of Guadalupe. Juan Diego never could have imagined the results of his simple gift. The “yes” of Juan Diego led to the construction of a shrine, inspired millions of conversions, and still transforms lives to this day.

 

We all have roses and small coins. If we can step out in faith and offer the little we have, who knows what great deeds God will do?

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Stewardship Saint

In this internet age, we have unique insight into the lives of modern day saints. St. Teresa of Kolkata is much beloved for her care for the poorest of the poor in the slums of India.

Born in Albania, St. Teresa began her religious life as a member of the Sisters of Loreto. After a placement in India teaching at a boarding school, she experienced what she referred to as a “call within a call.” Seeing the destitute on the margins of society, St. Teresa could no longer remain behind the walls of the school. She was compelled to take her ministry to the streets. In 1950 she received permission for the community that would become the Missionaries of Charity.

In St. John Paul II’s document on the Dignity and Vocation of Women, he writes “the moral and spiritual strength of a woman is joined to her awareness that God entrusts the human being to her in a special way” (30).

What is stewardship if not entrusting? God gives us our life, with all it’s gifts, strengths, and weaknesses. St. Teresa of Kolkata recognized that she was entrusted with her life, her one life, to offer as a gift to those in need. As the Missionaries of Charity grew, as donations came in and convents were built, St. Teresa recognized that not only was she entrusted with the means to serve, but she was entrusted with the person themselves. Every person she encountered – the dying, the disabled, the refugees, the orphan – she met as if meeting as Christ.

 

As we grow in a stewardship way of life, let us remember that we are not only entrusted with our finances and abilities, but we are entrusted with one another, brothers and sisters in the family of God.

 

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Announcements

A stewardship way of life happens in the day-to-day of each parish and each parishioner. The Region VIII stewardship day, occurring August 17th and 18th, offered just such a perspective. Hosted in Minnesota’s St. Paul-Minneapolis Archdiocese, the day opened with Mass celebrated by local Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda.

Dave Baranowski gave the inspiring conference keynote, offering his observations and insights on stewardship over the years. Baranowski has served as the Director of Stewardship Education for the Archdiocese of St. Louis since 2012. His presentation can be found online here.

The conference featured a number of breakout sessions, laid over the two-day conference. Many sessions featured presentations on specific populations within the parish. Rev. Bil Rose, pastor of Christ the King in Toledo, OH, presented applications of stewardship spirituality to senior parish members, school families, and millennials.

Ryan O’Hara, Director of Mission Resources for the college ministry Saint Paul’s Outreach, shared advice on engaging youth and young adults. Estela Villagran Manancero, Director of Latino Ministries for the Archdiocese of St. Paul-Minneapolis, offered insights into communicating stewardship to the Latino community.

When stewardship is so often equated with financial gifts, helping parishioners to identify their unique strengths and talents is critical. Two local Gallup Strengths Facilitators, including Mary Kennedy, Director of Stewardship and Development at Pax Christi Catholic Church, presented “Growing and Sustaining Strengths & Engagement in Our Parish.”

Keynote speaker Dave Baranowski continued to offer his wisdom throughout the conference, leading breakout sessions on the spirituality of money and running an annual stewardship renewal.

The conference included opportunities for networking with fellow stewardship professionals and vendors leading the field in stewardship tools. ICSC is proud to partner with local leader to offer opportunities nationwide for communities to grow in a stewardship way of life!

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